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2021 | Black Lives Matter Artist Grant Exhibition

Aisha Harrison, Lisa Myers Bulmash, Hasaan Kirkland, Rene Westbrook , Troy Riley Miles, Jasmine Iona Brown, Robert J Lloyd, Grace June, Zinda K Foster, Whitney Evans, Jennifer Kuhns, Cynthia Camlin, Myron Curry, Jackie Schaubel, Derek E Johnson, Maya Milton , Bonnie Hopper, Tracy Poindexter-Canton, Damon Brown, and Felicia Follum

EXHIBITION | September 7, 2021 – December 18, 2021

ABOUT | The Black Lives Matter Artist Grant Exhibition will celebrate and showcase twenty Washington artists who are using their voices, experiences, and artistic expression toward social justice efforts in response to systemic racism. The WSU Schnitzer Museum’s 20 recipients are: Aisha Harrison, Lisa Myers Bulmash, Hasaan Kirkland, Rene Westbrook , Troy Riley Miles, Jasmine Iona Brown, Robert J Lloyd, Grace June, Zinda K Foster, Whitney Evans, Jennifer Kuhns, Cynthia Camlin, Myron Curry, Jackie Schaubel, Derek E Johnson, Maya Milton , Bonnie Hopper, Tracy Poindexter-Canton, Damon Brown, and Felicia Follum.

Each awardee received a grant of $2,500 to fund the creation of art and pubic awareness. The grants were made in a partnership with the Jordan Schnitzer Family Foundation which funded similar programs at the University of Oregon and Portland State University.

“I have often said artists are chroniclers of our time. We all feel anguish about the death of George Floyd and many others at the hands of racial oppression,” said Jordan Schnitzer, president of The Harold & Arlene Schnitzer CARE Foundation and the Jordan Schnitzer Family Foundation. “We, more than ever, need artists to help us understand this issue and help us heal.”

Additional funding for this exhibition is provided by the Samuel H. and Patricia W. Smith Endowment and members of the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art WSU.

Special thanks to the review committee which included Ryan Hardesty, Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art WSU; Io Palmer, Department of Fine Arts WSU; Lisa Guerrero, School of Languages, Cultures, and Race WSU; Trymaine Gaither, Honors College WSU; and Mikayla Makle, Black Student Union WSU.

LOCATION | The  Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art WSU is located in the Crimson Cube (on Wilson Road across from Martin Stadium and the CUB) on the WSU Pullman campus. Check Covid-19 updates for our open hours. For more information please contact the museum at 509-335-1910.


2020 | Artist Profiles, Winners Black Lives Matter Artist Grant

To learn more about each of the 20 artists awarded grants, please click the link above.

2021 | Indie Folk: New Art and Songs from the Pacific Northwest

Including: Marita Dingus, Warren Dykeman, Joe Feddersen, Blair Saxon-Hill, Whiting Tennis, and Cappy Thompson

EXHIBITION | January 18, 2022 – May 21, 2022

ABOUT |The Pacific Northwest is home to a unique artistic ecosystem involving craft traditions, pre-industrial cultures, and Indigenous and settler histories. Like folk art, the works featured here are handmade, straightforward, and often blur the line between functionality and aesthetics. Artisanal woven baskets and tooled-wood objects mix with works that are makeshift, improvisational, and often employ salvaged materials. For the artists—patchwork quilters and abstract painters alike—a rural and working-class ethos of making do with what you have is as foundational as art history and studio technique.

This exhibition will include many significant artistic practitioners of the region including Marita Dingus, Warren Dykeman, Joe Feddersen, Blair Saxon-Hill, Whiting Tennis, and Cappy Thompson. Check back here for a full list of participating artists soon. A playlist of Indie Folk music selected by Portland’s Mississippi Records will accompany the exhibition, filling the galleries with the sound of the Pacific Northwest.

Funding for this exhibition is provided by the members of the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art WSU.
Curated by Melissa E. Feldman and organized by the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art WSU.

About the Curator | Along with her ongoing work as an independent curator and writer, Melissa Feldman held positions for the last several years as Distinguished Visiting Faculty at Cornish College of the Arts, Seattle, and Director of the Neddy Artist Awards, a regional grant with related public programming and exhibitions. Recent curatorial projects include Indie Folk: New Art from the Pacific Northwest (2020) at adamsandollman.com; Uses of History (2019) at studio e, Seattle; Free Play, an Independent Curators International touring exhibition (2013-17): A Cool Breeze: L.A. and Vancouver Art in the 1960s and Beyond at Griffin Art Projects, Vancouver B.C. (2017); Another Minimalism: Art After California Light and Space (2015-16), at the Fruitmarket Gallery, Edinburgh and travelling to the Mead Gallery, University of Warwick, Coventry, UK; Dance Rehearsal: Karen Kilimnik’s World of Ballet and Theatre (2012) at Mills College Art Museum, Oakland, and travelling to the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver. Feldman has been a frequent contributor to Art in America and Frieze among other international publications and has taught at the California College of Art, the San Francisco Art Institute, and Goldsmith’s College, London. Feldman is credited with organizing the first monographic exhibitions for Kilimnik, Martin Kippenberger, and Hiroshi Sugimoto in the 1990s as a curator at the Institute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia.

LOCATION | The  Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art WSU is located in the Crimson Cube (on Wilson Road across from Martin Stadium and the CUB) on the WSU Pullman campus. Check Covid-19 updates for our open hours. For more information please contact the museum at 509-335-1910.

2021 | Master of Fine Arts Thesis

Stephanie Broussard

EXHIBITION | April 6, 2021 – May 8, 2021
LIVESTREAMED ARTISTS’S TALK |
Friday, April 9, 2021, 4:00-5:00 pm
By: Stephanie Broussard, MFA Graduate Candidate, Note: This program is fully virtual.

OPEN GALLERY WITH STEPHANIE BROUSSARD | Friday, April 9, 2021, 1:00-3:30 pm
Stephanie Broussard will be present in the museum gallery to informally welcome visitors to her Master of Fine Arts Thesis exhibition. The artist will respond to your questions and provide impromptu tours during this time.

ABOUT | This annual showcase is the culmination of two or more years work by the Master of Fine Arts graduate candidates. With its wide range of art-making approaches, the thesis exhibition provides a stimulating experience for faculty, students, and museum visitors. This year’s MFA candidate is Stephanie Broussard, who will be featured in a solo exhibition in the museum’s Pavilion gallery as well as virtually through the museum’s online programming.

Stephanie Broussard’s work interprets and plays with perceptions of space utilizing the language of paint. Through a series of contrasting themes, she has constructed narrative paintings revolving around distance & closeness; interior & exterior; cityscape & landscape; spiritual & physical; presence & absence.

Traveling from many places to join the cohort at WSU, Broussard engaged in an intense two-year interdisciplinary studio program and met regularly with faculty members for group and individual critiques. Visiting artists and scholars provided diverse one-on-one insight into her creative work while the artist sharpened her confidence, convictions, and skills. Their MFA Thesis Exhibition is a focused conclusion, yet it also marks an exciting transition toward professional careers. » More …

2021 | Mirror, Mirror: The Prints of Alison Saar

From the Collections of Jordan D. Schnitzer and His Family Foundation

EXHIBITION | September 7, 2021 – March 12, 2022
PROGRAM | TBD

ABOUT | American artist Alison Saar is known not only for her powerful sculptures—she is also a master of the art of printmaking. In both forms, she employs a personal vocabulary informed by history, race, and mythology. Her influences range from ancient Europe, Africa, and American folk art. Saar’s works narrate stories of the African American experience, moving effortlessly from the personal to the political. In many of her works, she charts the tragic history of slavery in America, but her figures symbolize defiance and strength. Other recurring images are informed by jazz, romance, and desire. » More …

2021 | Under the Same Sun and Moon: New Acquisitions from the Collection

EXHIBITION | March 9, 2021 – August 14, 2021

ABOUT | Under the Same Sun and Moon: New Acquisitions from the Collection puts on view, in most instances for the first time, selections from collection newcomers. Over the last five years, the museum has added significant works of art to its permanent collection through selective purchases and generous gifts. Highlights include a quartet of complex prints by artist Jim Hodges as well as series of watercolors by the late artist Rick Bartow. Other important artists who have had works recently acquired by the museum include Ann Hamilton, Julie Mehretu, Marie Watt, and Richard Tuttle. These works have deepened our holdings of previously collected artists and provide introductions to artists new to us. The exhibition also serves as a reminder of the generosity of many donors who understand the value of sharing great art with our community. It is only through such philanthropy that museum collections grow, and our horizons evolve. » More …

2021 | Follow the River: Portraits of the Columbia Plateau

EXHIBITION | March 9, 2021 – August 14, 2021
PROGRAM | Wednesday, March 10, 2021 – 4:00-5:00 p.m.
YouTube Live: Portraits of the Columbia Plateau With Curator Michael Holloman
PROGRAM | Thursday, March 18, 2021 – 5:00-5:45 p.m.
Livestreamed Webinar: Into the Archives: Photography from the Colville Reservation

EXHIBITION| A coda to the proceeding Follow the Sun: The Holland and Orton Collections exhibition, Follow the River: Portraits of the Columbia Plateau will reframe the museum’s Worth D. Griffin Collection of Native portraiture alongside cultural materials from Plateau tribes including the Palus (Palouse) and Nimiipuu (Nez Perce) whose homelands the Washington State University Pullman campus is located upon.

In the summer of 1936, Washington State College (WSC) Fine Arts Department Chair Worth D. Griffin (with the support of WSC President E. O. Holland and the Board of Regents) began an ambitious series of oil on canvas portraits of “Indians of the Northwest tribes and other historic characters.” This commissioned project focused on prominent pioneers and tribal leaders from the Inland Northwest. It was recommended that Griffin take note of the mid-nineteenth century Pacific Railroad Survey Reports, particularly their illustrations and ethnographic descriptions of American Indians of the West. Griffin expanded upon these resources with his artistic expertise in portraiture, while dutifully engaging the ongoing and erroneous public perception of Native Americans as a vanishing race. » More …

2021 | World Without Reason: Goya’s Los Disparates

EXHIBITION | April 6, 2021 – August 14, 2021
PROGRAM |  Wednesday, April 21, 2021 – 4:00-5:00 p.m.
Livestreamed Lecture by Janis A. Tomlinson, Los Disparates and Goya’s Late Works: Triumphs of Caprice

ABOUT | Dreamlike and wondrous, yet gravely dark and harrowing, are all descriptors associated with Francisco José de Goya y Lucientes’ (1746-1828) last major print cycle, Los Disparates (or Los Proverbios). Published in 1864, thirty-six years after the artist’s death, these masterful etchings are still considered to be enigmatic and ambiguous, eluding definitive explanation and interpretation. While the Spanish term “disparate” translates imperfectly to “folly”, in Goya’s time the term held harsher connotations closer in meaning to stupidity or madness. And yet, Los Disparates were born of specific circumstances referencing fanatic religious practices of the day, the plight of political prisoners, and the decadence of court life and the aristocracy. Within these remarkable etchings is a realm of witches, ghosts, and fantastical creatures that invade the mind; Goya’s troubled visions remain a potent warning against a world without reason. » More …

2020 | Betty Feves: The Earth Itself

EXHIBITION | May 26, 2020 – February 12, 2021

“I was too much the farmer’s daughter, in a sense. You know, that marvelous dirt out there that gets turned over with a plow and getting my hands dirty was the thing that turned me on.”

ABOUT | Betty Feves: The Earth Itself presents loaned and promised works by significant yet under-recognized artist Betty Whiteman Feves (1918–1985). Feves belongs to a generation of groundbreaking artists who expanded the use of clay in art. Featuring a wide-range of art from across Feves’ career, the exhibition will include early figurative and architectural forms, functional wares, bonfire pots, and large-scale sculpture. An advocate for living locally throughout her lifetime, Feves was committed to relentless experimentation with regionally-sourced materials. She created her own clay bodies and glazes from her immediate environment and the geology of the Columbia Basin provided a lifelong reservoir of inspiration. Her work continues to be exhibited nationally and internationally, and set the stage for clay to become the expressive medium it is today. » More …

Collection Study Center

Home of the Museum's Permanent Collection

Collection Study Center

The Museum’s Collection Study Center (CSC) is unique within the WSU system. While the new Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art WSU places the arts at the heart of the student experience, the Collection Study Center provides an equally important portal for academic research and professional training through personalized access to the important works in WSU’s permanent collection. This new space, with open collection storage, viewing galleries, classroom areas, and expert collections staff will provide students opportunities to engage in academic research and courses, interdisciplinary collaborations, and professional training to further their chosen career goals. » More …

2020 | MFA Online Exhibition

QARTHIAN

EXHIBITION | March 31 – May 9, 2020 (online exhibition during COVID-19 temporary closure)
RECEPTION | Reception has been canceled in accordance with the cancellation of WSU Mom’s Weekend

2020 | QARTHIAN MASTER OF FINE ARTS THESIS STATEMENT

You Can’t Hot Glue Your Cat Back Together

“In 2015, we moved to Sonoma County. I was content to play in the dry creek bed for a time, but eventually, I longed to wander in the bay forest. I got lost. It was assumed that I had been trampled by wild pigs. And I was left behind.

I’ve been walking North ever since. I’m trying to get back to my home. I’m a very old tuxedo cat, now. And even if I reach my home, I know I can never return to the past I long for.”

-Igor (wherabouts unknown) » More …