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2019 | Poetry Comix Presentation, Mita Mahato

SPECIAL EVENT | Poetry Comix Presentation, Mita Mahato, RE-KINDLE

Date: Thursday, February 14
Time: 3:00-4:00 p.m. Reception to follow.
Location: WSU-Pullman Campus, Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art

RE-KINDLE asks what it means to reawaken love. Featuring a selection of works from WSU’s Lynn R. Hansen Comics Archive and pieces by Seattle-based artist and poet Mita Mahato owned by the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art, the exhibit looks at love, loss, and reconnection with one another and with the plants and animals who are our kin.

Mita Mahato is a cut paper, comics, and collage artist whose work explores loss by engaging the transformative capacities of found and handmade papers. A selection of her poetry comics, collectively titled In Between, was published by Pleiades Press in 2017. Her book Sea was recognized by Cartoonists NW as 2015’s “best comic book,” and her comics art has been exhibited in galleries across the country. In 2017, she served as the first Artist-in-Residence at the School of Medicine at UC Riverside. She is an Associate Professor of English at the University of Puget Sound, serves on the board for the arts organization Short Run Seattle as well as the steering committee for Graphic Medicine, and is a teaching artist with the Henry Art Gallery.

Mita Mahato’s visit is co-sponsored by the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art, Manuscripts, Archives, and Special Collections, and the Common Reading Program.

LOCATION | The  Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art WSU is located in the Crimson Cube (on Wilson Road across from Martin Stadium and the CUB) on the WSU Pullman campus. The hours of our six galleries are Tuesday – Saturday, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m., closed Sunday and Monday. For more information please contact the museum at 509-335-1910.

2019 | Black History Month Reception and Celebration

SPECIAL EVENT | Black History Month Reception and Celebration
Date: Thursday, February 7, 2019
Time: 5-7 p.m.
Location: Pavilion, Bruce/Floyd and Borth Galleries | Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art WSU

In conjunction with the Social Space Exhibition, the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art WSU is hosting a reception and celebration for Black History Month on Thursday, February 7 from 5-7 p.m. in the Pavilion, Bruce/Floyd and Borth Galleries.

Enjoy a lively discussion and gallery talk with special projects curator Sidney Murphy introducing the work of African American artists Mark Bradford, Leonardo Drew, Julie Mehretu, and Wangechi Mutu. Participatory events with multiple WSU student artists are planned to surprise and intrigue audiences.

Refreshments and a variety of light fare offered, admission is free, everyone is welcome!

LOCATION | The  Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art WSU is located in the Crimson Cube (on Wilson Road across from Martin Stadium and the CUB) on the WSU Pullman campus. The hours of our six galleries are Tuesday – Saturday, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m., closed Sunday and Monday. For more information please contact the museum at 509-335-1910.

Grand Opening Invitation: Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art WSU

Please join us for the Grand Opening Dedication Ceremony on Friday, April 6 (mom’s weekend) from noon to 1:00 p.m. President Kirk Schulz, architect Jim Olson, and patron Jordan Schnitzer will share their thoughts. Refreshments will be served in the Pavilion gallery and tours will be given every two hours. The new museum is located directly South of the CUB on Terrell Mall of the Pullman campus. » More ...

2017 FALL EXHIBIT | CONTEMPORARY WOMEN PRINTMAKERS

Contemporary Women Printmakers celebrates six internationally recognized women artists invested in printmaking, a process both physically and technically demanding. Featured artists include Hung Liu, Wangechi Mutu, Deborah Oropallo, Wendy Red Star, Alison Saar and Lorna Simpson. Hailing from many places around the world—Africa, Asia, and North America—these artists offer a diverse set of perspectives on a wide-range of themes pertaining to global culture. Each is critically engaged with content surrounding issues of identity formation—through gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, or economic class—and each employs figuration as a means to explore representations of the female body within contemporary art and popular culture. » More ...

2017 SUMMER | CURATORS CHOICE EXHIBIT

Reflections on Place through WSU Faculty and the Museum Collection
May 16 – June 30, 2017

“The intersections of nature, culture, history, and ideology form the ground on which we stand—our land, our place, the local.” –Lucy Lippard

ABOUT | In his essay Towards a Critical Regionalism, architectural historian Kenneth Frampton denounced the prevailing “international” style of architecture—modular, rational, often partly pre-fabricated—for reducing regional variance to the point that new buildings in cities across the world were beginning to look altogether and everywhere the same. As an ensuing extension of Frampton’s argument, artists of various disciplines have taken up the challenge of balancing regional difference within a hyper-connected, globalized world. Today’s culture-makers have an opportunity to benefit from burgeoning avenues of information exchange and de-centralized seats of power, while critically responding to local conditions; reflective of their community’s histories, cultural-makeup, and the particulars of the surrounding land.

Points of Interest brings together four Washington State University faculty members—Ruth Boden, Kevin Haas, Taiji Miyasaka, and Linda Russo—whom each, in their own way, provide a lens onto the multi-faceted idea of “place.” Through their creative practices and current research these individuals probe themes of uniqueness as it pertains to locale, but also, degrees of sameness and shared commonalities through cultural synthesis. Supplementing and providing context to their inquiries will be selections of place-based works drawn from the museum’s permanent collection of over 3500 objects.

The Museum of Art is committed to the idea that a museum has a responsibility to recognize the creative talent of its region.  Anna-Maria Shannon, Interim Director of the museum adds, “Our over-arching goal is to support creativity and innovation in students who can seek out divergent opinions, examine complex issues from a variety of perspectives and find meaning in the world.”

LOCATION | The Museum of Art is located on Wilson Road across from Martin Stadium in the Fine Arts Center on the WSU Pullman campus. Gallery hours are Tuesday – Saturday, noon – 4 p.m., closed Sunday and Monday. For more information please contact the museum at 509-335-1910.

 

WSU FACULTY PROFESSORS |

Ruth Boden

Kevin Haas

Taiji Miyasaka

Linda Russo

TRADITION & CHANGE: CONTEXTUALIZING THE ART OF RICK BARTOW

The Museum of Art/WSU will host an exhibition walk-through with Michael Holloman, Associate Professor of Art History and American Indian Studies, Washington State University on February 22 from 12:00 to 1:00 p.m. in the Museum Gallery.

Drawing from his experiences as a liaison between regional tribes and cultural institutions, Michael Holloman will lead a discussion in defining traditional Native arts and then guide us through the emergence of indigenous artists within the contemporary art field. Professor Holloman will place the work of Rick Bartow in a contemporary context through highlighting a key works within the exhibition.

LOCATION | The Museum of Art is located on Wilson Road across from Martin Stadium in the Fine Arts Center on the WSU Pullman campus. Gallery hours are Tuesday – Saturday, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m., closed Sunday and Monday. For more information please contact the museum at 509-335-1910.

2017 WINTER | RICK BARTOW: Things You Know But Cannot Explain

“Rick Bartow: Things You Know But Cannot Explain,” opens at the Museum of Art/WSU
Exhibit: January 24 – March 11, 2017
Reception: Thursday, January 26, 5-6 p.m.
Lecture: Thursday, January 26, 6-7 p.m.
(With Dr. Rebecca Dobkins, Professor of Anthropology and Curator of Native American Art, Hallie Ford Museum of Art, Willamette University)

The Museum of Art/WSU announces an Exhibition by Rick Bartow: Thing You Know But Cannot Explain, Jan. 24–Mar. 11, 2017. An opening reception and lecture will be held 5-7 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 26, in the Museum of Art gallery. Admission to the museum is free.

ABOUT | Representing more than forty years of work, Rick Bartow: Things You Know But Cannot Explain features a broad selection of sculptures, paintings, drawings and prints, drawn from public and private collections, including the artist’s studio, that affirm this extraordinary artist’s regional, national, and international impact. Personal experiences, cultural engagement and global myths, especially Native American transformation stories, are at the heart of Bartow’s art. Animals and self-portraits populate his iconography, and he was known for astute interpretations of literary, musical and visual sources.

Born in 1946, Bartow was a member of the Wiyot tribe of Northern California and had close ties with Oregon’s Siletz community. His work has been featured in many solo and group exhibitions and is in numerous public and private collections. A recent career highlight was the completion of We Were Always Here (2012), a monumental pair of sculptures over 20 feet high installed on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. The renowned artist recently passed away in the spring of 2016.

Rick Bartow: Things You Know But Cannot Explain was organized by the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art, University of Oregon.

LOCATION | The Museum of Art is located on Wilson Road across from Martin Stadium in the Fine Arts Center on the WSU Pullman campus. Gallery hours are Tuesday – Saturday, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m., closed Sunday and Monday. For more information please contact the museum at 509-335-1910.

CHRIS WATTS | 2016 Fine Arts Faculty Focus Exhibition

The Museum of Art/WSU announces a retrospective journey in a Fine Arts Faculty Focus Exhibition by artist Chris Watts, Aug. 22– Sept. 17. An opening reception will be held 6 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 25, in the Museum of Art gallery with a talk given by the artist at 7 p.m.  Admission to the museum is free.

The Museum of Art has a long-standing tradition of presenting work by department of Fine Arts faculty members. Since 2004, these exhibits have alternated large group shows with a biennial exhibit showcasing a recently retired faculty member. This year the museum presents a retrospective exhibit of Chris Watts’ work, who retired in 2015, after 27 years of teaching drawing and painting at WSU.

ABOUT | Citing influences as diverse as Bronze Age monuments, spirals and mazes, Pythagoras, counting processes, scientific structures, bell ringing, Theosophy, and the geometric tradition in art; Chris Watts’  work represents a long-term inquiry into systems of order, patterning, and to a certain degree, spiritual or esoteric ideas. His investigation of the underlying structures of the world around us—expressed through drawings, paintings and constructions—connects Watts to a long lineage of peoples who have organized worldviews through pattern and abstract form.

LOCATION | The Museum of Art is located on Wilson Road across from Martin Stadium in the Fine Arts Center on the WSU Pullman campus. Gallery hours are Monday – Saturday, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m., open until 7 p.m. on Thursdays and closed on Sundays. For more information please contact the museum at 509-335-1910.

SPECIAL THANKS | This exhibit is funded by the Members of the Museum of Art and the Samuel H. and Patricia W. Smith Arts Endowment.